Dillon’s Law

Dillon’s Law signed by Governor Scott Walker on Dec 11, 2017 at Mishicot High School – 3 years after Dillon’s Wake was held in the same gymnasium.

Dillon’s Law seeks to improve access to life-saving Epinephrine by allowing trained individuals to carry this medication and administer to someone in need before help can arrive.

The Dillon Mueller Memorial Fund advocates for this law across the country. It saves lives.

Donations can be mailed to:
Dillon Mueller Memorial Fund
2205 E. Cty. Hwy. V
Mishicot, WI 54228

Model Legislation

Dillon’s Law has been passed with 100% bipartisan support in multiple states:

Wisconsin (2017): 2017 Act 133
Minnesota (2019): Chapter 61 – S.F.No. 1257 **Current Model Legislation**

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FAQ

What is Dillon’s Law?
Dillon’s Law allows any individual to be trained, carry, and use an epinephrine auto-injectors to save someone having a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis).

Why do we need Dillon’s Law?
An allergic reaction can happen to anyone, anywhere, anytime. Epinephrine must be rapidly available. The sooner it is given the greater are the chances it will save their life.

Why is it called Dillon’s Law?
Dillon Mueller was stung by a bee when he was 18 years old. He later died from a severe allergic reaction. He had never reacted to a bee sting previously. Dillon’s Law is intended to prevent this tragedy from happening to someone else.

How do I get trained?
The Do It for Dillon Anaphylaxis Training Program is approved by the Wisconsin Department of Health and can be submitted to other states that approve a version of Dillon’s Law. Please click here for more information.

Endorsements

Wisconsin Association of Osteopathic Physicians & Surgeons (WAOPS)
Pharmacy Society of Wisconsin
Wisconsin Nurses Association
Wisconsin Medical Society
Wisconsin Academy of Family Physicians
Wisconsin Public Health Association
Wisconsin Association of Local Helath Departments and Boards
Midwest Association of Independent Camps
Food Allergy Association of Wisconsin